mkdir(): File exists » review Ed Hale and The Transcendence
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Brand new studio album!

 
February 1, 2012

Sloucher reviews All Your Heroes…

A concept album of sorts, Ed Hale and the Transcendence‘s All your heroes become villains is a collection of songs tackling different genres. Not too diverse to be disparate but still different enough to be dissimilar, it harks to some brit pop, some prog rock and, of course, some blues based rock.

After a strange, chaotic and almost cacophony-laden intro (‘All your heroes become villains – Main Theme’), the band goes for a more straight up approach. ‘Blind eye’ has a foot clearly planted in 70s arena rock with some good ol’ riffing (rocking moments there). It’s a wild song and it’s a safehaven after the more experimental nature of the opening track.

Read full review: http://sloucher.org/2012/01/10/ed-hale-and-the-transcendence-all-your-heroes-become-villains/

January 14, 2012

Call Upon The Author reviews All Your Heroes…

Let’s get one thing straight before we go any further – I had not heard of Ed Hale or The Transcendence before CUTA editor Matt passed me this album with a glint in his eye. I make this statement because by the time you finish reading this review, I’m hoping that your never having heard of them either won’t stop you from giving this cracking album a go. Because that’s what it is – a cracking album. I mean, sure, there’s a lot going on, and it’s a little bit nuts, but since the fateful day when Matt handed it over, I haven’t stopped listening to it. I’m listening to it now, while I write this review. It’s intriguing, addictive, maddening, impossible to pin down…yeah. Like I said.

December 14, 2011

Classic Rock Society review in Jan/Feb 2012 issue

October 8, 2011

Soundsphere’s review of “All Your Heroes Become Villains”



The fourth studio album by itinerant project Ed Hale And The Transcendence brings together new contributors and a collection of songs intertwining the talents and influences gathered together. The album opener offers uplifting soul vocals accompanied by a blissful piano and trumpet melody which ebbs and flows during the eleven tracks. Intermittent phrases of dialogue, another recurring motif carried throughout, consolidate a cinematic feel of the LP as the prelude segues into the next.

‘Here It Comes’ is the track infused most with the spirit of Britpop; the anthemic instrumentation, the rousing chorus and the soaring strings all present and correct. Hallmark elements of the Britpop sound also surface in ‘Solaris’, where Hale’s vocals, carried along by jaunty acoustic guitar chords, echo Bono and Alex Kapranos in parts; ‘After Tomorrow’, seven minutes in length, apes the likes of the mellow vibes and extended outro of ‘Champagne Supernova’ and the close backing harmonies of ‘Hey Jude’.


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